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A practical resource packed full of helpful advice, inspiring ideas, and wisdom for the day to day life challenges and opportunities that come with living with developmental needs.

Tyler's Story

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Tyler is an energetic kid who loves to play with Legos and Power Rangers. His favorite color is blue and he loves reading Disney’s McQueen Series. He also enjoys playing at parks and playgrounds.   Tyler attends S. June Smith Center’s Inclusive Preschool. While Tyler doesn’t have any developmental needs, his parents shared with us a little bit about how the S. June Smith Center affected Tyler when his brother Max received services.   “Tyler was born with no issues and did not personally need the services.   But, Tyler participated with Max throughout his entire journey with the S. June Smith Center to date – from therapies to preschool!”   They continued to express how beneficial it was to have the S. June Smith Center involved in both of their lives, “We enjoy the fact that Tyler and Max can attend a preschool right now during the development stages where they really rely on each other.  Eventually, they may go to different schools, but they currently remain together where Tyler helps Max physically and Max helps Tyler socially!” This family-centered approach is at the core of the S. June Smith Center’s philosophy for delivering services.   Family time is very important to Tyler. He loves spending time with his twin brother, Max; big sisters, Emmie and Cami; and their puppy, Macy.

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Thad's Story

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Airplanes are something that Thad Schmidt is very familiar with. The 55-year-old Edinboro Circle resident has flown in several airplanes throughout his life. His late father was a smoke jumper in the 1940’s, parachuting onto forest fires in the Montana Rockies, and used to get his friends to give Thad rides.   “Dad was always interested in airplanes,” said Thad’s sister, Joyce Wenger, who has memories of going to the airport with Thad as kids and watching the airplanes take off.   Schmidt sits on the couch, leafing through a Toy Story coloring book. He may be nonverbal, but there’s something in his facial expressions that seem to convey a conversation without saying a word.   That’s how Wenger knew her brother was having the time of his life when they recently chartered a plane from Lancaster Airport.   “He was happy. I know he really enjoyed it,” she said. “He will often fall asleep while he’s riding in a car, but he stayed awake on the plane. He was definitely engaged.”   Gregg Williams, program supervisor for Edinboro Circle, arranged for Thad to take the private plane ride. While he wasn’t sure how Thad was going to react to it, he knew his love of planes was strong enough that he would enjoy it.   “We get close to the airport and he perks up,” Williams said. “He had a blast (flying).”   Schmidt and Wenger flew over Biglerville in Adams County, where they grew up. They got to see the house they used to live in, and fly over apple orchards, Wenger said.   Schmidt has been living in an Excentia group home for about a year. Now that he is in Lancaster, Wenger said she gets to see him more often. While they didn’t have much interaction when she was a young adult, her little brother has always held a special place in her heart and she makes a point to see him about once a week. She said they like to go on walks together and pet all the neighbors’ animals.   “Since he’s moved, it’s been wonderful to visit just with him,” Wenger said, adding that in the past she would visit her brother and her parents at the same time.   Schmidt lived with his parents until about three years ago – his father was 92 and his mother was 86 when he moved out. Wenger takes her mother, who is now 88 years old, to visit Thad weekly.   Getting up in the airplane was like stepping back in time, Wenger said.  Thad seemed to remember all those previous experiences of flying.   “He went right up to the airplane and got right up in it,” she said. “He was never scared. He always enjoyed it.  He sure knew what he was doing.”

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TRAIL Academy Graduation

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On September 16 2017 I had the pleasure of attending a very special graduation ceremony hosted by Excentia’s TRAIL Academy. In fact it was the first ever graduation ceremony of this amazing program offered to individuals who are seeking independency within their community. The goals and objectives of the Academy are Teaching, Reaching and Achieving Independent Living (TRAIL). The program did not come easy though and there were many hurdles for both the participants, their families and Excentia. [caption id="attachment_1728" align="alignnone" width="300"] Vicki,Ryan, Chris, Brett, Anna, Laurie,[/caption] The TRAIL Academy came to Excentia in June 2016 after over a year of waiting for an official answer. Laurie Kleynen and Anna Edling are the masterminds behind this program and with their persuasion and hard work Excentia was rewarded the program by Lancaster County BH/DS. The participants of TRAIL went through a series of evaluations and an assessment created by Excentia to make sure they were equipped with basic skills and so that their outcome would be successful.   Vicki Bricker, Director of Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities Services, Lancaster County BH/DS said at the graduation, “We wanted to create a program for the other guys.”   Vicki spoke at the graduation on how many services are focused on individuals with severe developmental disabilities and not so much on those individuals who are high functioning. Vicki and her colleagues have wanted to do something for “the other guys” for quite a few years now and she is more than thrilled with the outcome of Excentia’s TRAIL Academy.   For the last 18 months Ryan and Brett have been living together in a townhome located near Manor Shopping Center in Lancaster County. Together the two have been learning to live on their own. With the help of Direct Service Providers, Elizabeth Ortiz and Wendy Kurtz, they have been acquiring the skills and knowledge of budgeting, use of public transportation, emergency and safety skills, self-advocacy skills, securing employment, etc. [caption id="attachment_1638" align="alignnone" width="300"] Brett and Ryan at their townhome[/caption] On Saturday September 16 they were both awarded diplomas in front of friends, family and the army of people who got them to this milestone in their lives. Both Ryan and Brett took the time to thank everyone for their hardwork and dedication over the last year. Family and friends shared stories about how amazing this program is and what it has done for Ryan and Brett. My favorite story that was told happened to be about a fire drill that went south, quickly, but you had to be there to here about this one.   Anna Edling, Director of Residential Services, says “The individuals had the drive to want to live on their own. Without their drive, the instruction provided by the staff wouldn’t have been successful. While we did hit a few bumps in the road, together the individuals and program staff navigated a path that led Brett and Ryan to be successful in gaining the skills they needed to live independently. Seeing them now, moving into the next chapter of their life, each in their own apartment, is what makes me able to say that the program is a success.”   Ryan will be moving in with a roommate and Brett will be moving into a one bedroom apartment. They will both receive a few hours of support each week instead of the round the clock support like when they first started TRAIL. Two new individuals have been chosen for the 2nd year of the TRAIL Academy and will be moving into the townhome next month.   Congratulations Brett and Ryan! You both worked hard and deserve this!   If you are interested in becoming a Direct Service Provider please follow this link: https://www.ourexcentia.org/careers/. Excentia is always looking to add to our growing family!   Alpha Love and Mine, Lexis

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Events with the SJSC

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Last week I had the opportunity to visit two of Excentia’s S. June Smith Centers for fun filled days. On Thursday I visited the Ephrata preschool for their Olympic games and then on friday I headed to the Lancaster location for a preschool graduation. One thing that I noticed at each preschool were that the connections between the students and teachers were strong, pure and unbreakable.   Thursday When I first pulled up the Ephrata preschool I could tell we were in for an eventful morning because all of the olympic themed games were already set up outside. As I entered the main building classroom the sound of laughter and play filled the room. The kids were having playtime and snack time until the other classroom would join us. Once the other class showed up the real fun began. We all circled around a parachute, the colorful one that most of us remember playing with in gym classes when we were little kids. The kids started pulling up and down while I added beach balls into the mix, but since all of the children were different heights many times the balls would fall right to the ground. After the opening ceremony parachute game we split up into two groups -- one inside and one outside. The children who were outside played games such as the mini beach ball toss, wet sponge toss and water blaster archery with balloons. While the outdoor activities took place the other group was inside golfing, having a beach ball toss and even an ocean themed scavenger hunt. Though there wasn’t any competition among the kids during the olympic games they all still received gold medals at the closing ceremonies.                         Friday On friday I was invited to the lancaster preschool graduation which really excited me because the last preschool graduation I attended my own. When I approached the classroom the first thing I noticed were the beautiful decorations that the teacher and staff had made to make the room more lively and interactive. As I navigated through the sea of parents for my seat the sound of live music filled the air from violinists in the center of the room.   While waiting for the graduation to start myself and about 30 people were greeted by Sally who is the classroom teacher. After her opening words a woman from Earth Rhythms, a local business, handed the soon to be graduates instruments and had the entire room join along in clapping and song. As the children were getting ready for their official graduation ceremony we continued to sing songs.   After a few moments the room filled with the sound of the official graduation music played by the violinists. Each child walked back into the room but this time they all had on graduation gowns and caps, which made every parent’s face light up. After they all sat down they were presented with their diplomas and artwork that they had completed in anticipation for the big day. One thing that grounded all of us was when a diploma was presented to a family who had just lost their child the previous week.   Attending the preschool graduation and olympic games made me very thankful for the position that I am in with Excentia. I wouldn’t have these opportunities otherwise to meet and interact with the teachers, families and students who are directly impacted by Excentia’s S. June Smith Center.   If you would like to watch the lancaster preschool graduation you can watch it below.         Alpha Love and Mine, Lexis

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Thad's Story

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Airplanes are something that Thad Schmidt is very familiar with. The 55-year-old Edinboro Circle resident has flown in several airplanes throughout his life. His late father was a smoke jumper in the 1940’s, parachuting onto forest fires in the Montana Rockies, and used to get his friends to give Thad rides.   “Dad was always interested in airplanes,” said Thad’s sister, Joyce Wenger, who has memories of going to the airport with Thad as kids and watching the airplanes take off.   Schmidt sits on the couch, leafing through a Toy Story coloring book. He may be nonverbal, but there’s something in his facial expressions that seem to convey a conversation without saying a word.   That’s how Wenger knew her brother was having the time of his life when they recently chartered a plane from Lancaster Airport.   “He was happy. I know he really enjoyed it,” she said. “He will often fall asleep while he’s riding in a car, but he stayed awake on the plane. He was definitely engaged.”   Gregg Williams, program supervisor for Edinboro Circle, arranged for Thad to take the private plane ride. While he wasn’t sure how Thad was going to react to it, he knew his love of planes was strong enough that he would enjoy it.   “We get close to the airport and he perks up,” Williams said. “He had a blast (flying).”   Schmidt and Wenger flew over Biglerville in Adams County, where they grew up. They got to see the house they used to live in, and fly over apple orchards, Wenger said.   Schmidt has been living in an Excentia group home for about a year. Now that he is in Lancaster, Wenger said she gets to see him more often. While they didn’t have much interaction when she was a young adult, her little brother has always held a special place in her heart and she makes a point to see him about once a week. She said they like to go on walks together and pet all the neighbors’ animals.   “Since he’s moved, it’s been wonderful to visit just with him,” Wenger said, adding that in the past she would visit her brother and her parents at the same time.   Schmidt lived with his parents until about three years ago – his father was 92 and his mother was 86 when he moved out. Wenger takes her mother, who is now 88 years old, to visit Thad weekly.   Getting up in the airplane was like stepping back in time, Wenger said.  Thad seemed to remember all those previous experiences of flying.   “He went right up to the airplane and got right up in it,” she said. “He was never scared. He always enjoyed it.  He sure knew what he was doing.”

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Paula's Story

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Paula Brocious loves horses.   Calming, relaxing, and providing a sense of peace and quiet are all things that her horse, Neptune, provides her.   “(It’s) the best part of my week,” she said, her face lighting up with an infectious smile.   Paula has been taking horse riding lessons every Monday for the past 20 years. She is one of Excentia’s many riders at Greystone Manor Therapeutic Riding Center in Lancaster.   Horseback riding provides numerous benefits to the rider, including cognitive, social and physical benefits, said Heather Mitterer, community outreach coordinator at Greystone.   Learning cause and effect through experiencing how the horse reacts when the rider shifts his weight, or forming an emotional bond with the horse are some of the benefits that riding provides. The horses also allow the riders to build confidence in themselves.   One example is someone with an attention disorder, Mitterer said. The act of riding a horse helps them develop and keep focus.   “They start to understand outside of themselves because there’s a horse that reacts and responds to everything they do,” she said.   Greystone Manor has been operating since 1981 and serves individuals with a documented disability. The non-profit houses 11 horses, all free-leased, and provides indoor and outdoor lessons, Mitterer said. The horses experience a thorough training period to ensure they are ready for riders, she added.   “Our instructors work hand-in-hand with each horse. They’ll try to spook it – everything they can to prepare the horse.  We want a horse who’s not going to panic over every single thing.”   When Greystone is no longer able to use the horse, they give it back to its owner, Mitterer said.   The stable does not utilize therapists with the riders – volunteers and instructors with special training and certifications in equine assisted activities help guide the rider so that they can eventually ride the horse themselves.   “It’s the horses that are doing the therapy,” Mitterer said.   Greystone also offers unmounted clinics, where clients focus on getting to know the horse, learn about safety, and how to care for and groom the horse before they ever mount it.   Karen Weber-Zug, who has been an instructor at Greystone for five years, has some amazing stories about how the horses have helped the riders. One rider, she remembers, had trouble with facial expressions and exhibited a flat affect. After taking lessons at the stable for several years, the 16-year-old now gives verbal responses.   “I’ll never forget the day I asked him if he wanted to go outside and he smiled,” she said.   With another client on the autism spectrum, instructors used the horse to teach the child how to accept change and be more flexible in his daily schedule, Weber-Zug said.   Riding horses is also a great benefit for those who cannot walk because the movement of the horse simulates the feeling of walking, Mitterer said.   “That’s an amazing feeling to know what that feels like,” she said. “You are controlling the horse.”   The specific benefits each rider receives depend on the individual person, Mitterer said.   Riders at Greystone range in age from 5 to 66. At 46, Brocious has achieved the ability to ride Neptune independently. She prefers to ride Neptune outside, if possible, but sometimes rain forces them indoors. When that happens, Brocious said Neptune gets scared, but she reassures him that it’s ok.   “I tell him not to be afraid,” she said.   Amanda Witmer, direct support staff at Excentia, said she likes to watch Brocious ride and see the relationship she has developed with Neptune.   “She’s very affectionate with the horses. She always has to say goodbye to them,” Witmer said.   In fact, Brocious has her own special way of saying goodbye to the horses. Before she dismounts, she guides the horse in a “moonwalk” of walking backwards. Brocious proudly states that she taught the horse how to do that.   “She just loves it. She talks about (riding) all the time,” Witmer said.

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Jillian's Story

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Jillian Leed stands at her stove, stirring a chicken, baked potato and vegetable soup. Just a year ago, this was something she couldn’t do.   The 35-year-old has been living independently in her own apartment for the last two years.   “I like it (here),” she said.   Her one-bedroom apartment on the second floor of her apartment complex is cozy, decorated with pictures of her family and complete with new furniture in the living room that Jillian proudly states she bought recently with her own money.   Jillian has been successful in achieving her dream of living on her own, now working full-time at Good Will on Lincoln Highway, taking public transportation to and from work, and managing her household with help only one day a week. But achieving this success didn’t happen overnight.   Anna Edling, Associate Director/Program Specialist for Residential, said Jillian first expressed an interest in having her own place in 2011. The first step was to find competitive employment, and then teach Jillian the skills she would need to be independent, including laundry, cooking, cleaning, navigating public transportation, and money management.   “It’s a process,” Edling said. “You don’t just say you want to move out and (then) move out the next day.”   After preparing her the best they could, Jillian moved into her apartment two years later in 2013. But even after she was on her own, Edling said they realized there were still skills she had to address. One of the big ones was socialization. When she lived at Frederick Circle, there was always someone to talk to or play a game with. Suddenly, Jillian was all alone. She started peering into her neighbor’s windows, looking for that contact with other people, Edling said.   Staff started role-playing with Jillian, training her in social situations. Since taking the bus to work every day was a major factor in Jillian’s success, staff addressed the safety issues that come along with being in public places all alone. One of the ways they role-played was having staff approach her while she rode the bus, asking her questions like her name and her address to make sure Jillian knew not to give out her personal information to strangers.   That practice has seeped in to her life in other areas beyond the riding the bus.   “No strangers! No strangers come into my apartment,” Jillian said emphatically.   Taking steps to move from a group home into one’s own apartment is a complicated process, Edling said. Many don’t realize all the many skills that are needed to achieve such a goal.   “Think about your everyday life and all the things you do,” Edling said. “All those little skills that we take for granted, she didn’t know how to do. We want her to live an everyday life like the rest of us.”   That includes waking up on time in order to take a shower and get to work, realizing at the end of the day that you didn’t plan for dinner, going to the grocery store, coming home and making dinner … the list goes on, she said.   “There are a huge amount of skills that we take for granted every day and she had to be taught,” Edling said.   For example, when Jillian lived on Frederick Circle, one of her chores was to mop the kitchen floor. As the scheduled was laid out, Jillian only had to mop the floor once every three weeks since her roommates did the other weeks. When Jillian first moved into her apartment, she was only mopping the floor once every three weeks. Edling said she had to remind Jillian that she alone was responsible for that now, so she had to do it every week.   Another skill was cooking, and Jillian seems to have mastered that. She frequently gets up from the couch to go to the stove and check on her soup, stirring it and tasting it. The apartment starts to take on the hearty aroma and warmth of the soup.   “I’m making tacos today,” she says excitedly, a new meal she is learning.   Brandy Inhenyen, program coordinator and staff member assigned to work with Jillian every Thursday when Jillian has off work, said she has been working with Jillian for about a year. Her job now is easy.   “She’s really improved in her cooking skills. She was scared to use the stove when I first started. Now, she does it all herself.” Inhenyen said. “I’m just here to give prompts. She knows what she needs to do.”   Inhenyen said the only thing that Jillian still struggles with is money management. She pulls out a roll of quarters and counts out the $1.50 Jillian needs to do her laundry.   “If I gave you this whole roll of quarters, you’d spend it,” she says to Jillian.   Jillian smiles sheepishly, admitting this to be true, as she takes the quarters and heads downstairs to the laundry room.   “Don’t put too much in,” she reminds herself as she puts her clothes into the washing machine.   Edling and Inhenyen said Jillian has inspired other clients to want to work toward independence. Two other clients have since moved out, but they are receiving help from their families and are no longer getting support from Excentia. Jillian is currently the only Excentia client living on her own.

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Tyler's Story

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Tyler is an energetic kid who loves to play with Legos and Power Rangers. His favorite color is blue and he loves reading Disney’s McQueen Series. He also enjoys playing at parks and playgrounds.   Tyler attends S. June Smith Center’s Inclusive Preschool. While Tyler doesn’t have any developmental needs, his parents shared with us a little bit about how the S. June Smith Center affected Tyler when his brother Max received services.   “Tyler was born with no issues and did not personally need the services.   But, Tyler participated with Max throughout his entire journey with the S. June Smith Center to date – from therapies to preschool!”   They continued to express how beneficial it was to have the S. June Smith Center involved in both of their lives, “We enjoy the fact that Tyler and Max can attend a preschool right now during the development stages where they really rely on each other.  Eventually, they may go to different schools, but they currently remain together where Tyler helps Max physically and Max helps Tyler socially!” This family-centered approach is at the core of the S. June Smith Center’s philosophy for delivering services.   Family time is very important to Tyler. He loves spending time with his twin brother, Max; big sisters, Emmie and Cami; and their puppy, Macy.

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