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TimberNook FAQs

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What is TimberNook? TimberNook is a nature-based developmental outdoor program that integrates sensory experiences, imagination and nature for all kids. Children play together and independently using stories, games, and new experiences to have fun, learn, develop, and explore. The TimberNook curriculum weaves together the therapeutic benefits of nature with activities that inspire children to think creatively, to accept challenges, and even to learn from failure.   What is TimberNook of Lancaster County? TimberNook of Lancaster County is offered as a service of Excentia, a nonprofit organization in Lancaster County that provides supports for people with developmental needs and autism throughout the lifespan. At TimberNook of Lancaster County, children have the chance to play together and independently, using stories, games, and experiences to have fun, learn, develop, and explore. Excentia believes in the TimberNook philosophy that the more children engage in self-directed play and take reasonable risks outdoors, the better equipped they are to be successful in home and school environments.   When will TimberNook programming happen? Storybook Session Dates: May 20 – 24 Time: 9:00am – 12:00pm Capacity: 20 Ages: 4-7 years Description: One of our most popular programs where young children “live and breathe” stories out in the wild. We’ll be doing everything from experimenting with colors in a giant foam experience for the story "Little Blue and Little Yellow" to creating life-sized spider webs over the mud after hearing the story "The Very Busy Spider." With the turn of every day comes a new story for the children to experience and lots of FUN!   Tiny Ones Session Dates: May 28 & 30 and June 4 & 6 Time: 9:00am - 11:00am Capacity: 16 Ages: 2-4 years with an adult Description: This program was designed for the smallest of our TimberNook adventurers. You and your child will venture into the woods for creative play opportunities that engage the mind and challenge the senses, such as hosting a tea party in the garden to doing “construction work” in mud puddles to experimenting with color in giant foam experiences. You’ll also walk away each week with an idea on how to inspire creative play at home.   Extreme Art Session Dates: June 10 – 14 Time: 9:00am - 3:00pm Capacity: 24 Ages: 7-12 years Description: This week is about art -- gone wild. Children will be dabbling in decorative fort making, rocket painting, and even cooking with colors. Each day brings new, creative art and play experiences. If you think your child will enjoy whole-body sensory art, than this is the program for them!   Going Wild Session Dates: July 8 -12 Time: 9:00am - 3:00pm Capacity: 24 Ages: 7-12 years Description: An all-time classic TimberNook camp for older children who enjoy taking play to a whole new level. Children will create an elaborate fort system equipped with trap doors, barricades, tunnel systems, and more. It will be a week full of adventure, games, and surprises! This program will stretch the minds of your young ones and leave them asking for more.   How much does it cost? Storybook Session: $110 Tiny Ones: $60 Extreme Art: $235 Wild Ones: $230   Where is the TimberNook site? All TimberNook sessions will be held at Climbers Run Nature Preserve, in partnership with the Lancaster County Conservancy. Climbers Run is located at 226 Frogtown Road, Pequea, PA 17565.   Who can attend TimberNook? Below is some information that may be helpful in deciding if your child would be successful in a TimberNook program. We are available to answer specific questions about your child, so please contact us if you have questions. As a program in the woods, children will be walking a short distance to the site; navigating over natural surfaces such as roots and uneven ground. Children should be able to follow directions such as being kind to other children and keeping an adult in sight at all times. Children should be able to stay within a designated area and not be a flight/elopement risk. TimberNook is a child-led program. This means that adults step back but tune in for many portions of the day. Peer interaction is a vital component of the program.   How do I register? Registration is coming in mid-February! Like our Facebook page and sign up for TimberNook email updates to receive the registration link as soon as it becomes available.   Who can I contact for more information? For more information about TimberNook, please contact Connie Walp, Excentia’s Director of Early Childhood Services, at connie@sjunesmith.com or 717-299-4829 ext 333.

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Making a SPLASH

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You peer through the window to catch a glimpse of this story hour you’ve heard about, called SPLASH (Sound Play Language Awareness Story Hour.) But where is the book? No one is reading. You see a group of eight parents and their children being led by a woman to march in place, hop up and down, and rock and roll side to side. Finally the woman says it is time to stop, and sit down (while also using the sign language for ‘stop’ and ‘sit’.) As her bottom hits the floor, she pairs a sound effect - “boom!” Once seated on the floor, she dramatically claims she’s hot; fanning herself as she lets out an exaggerated sigh, expressing “whew!” as she feigns wiping her forehead, and putting her hair up in a ponytail. This is a story hour?   Well, this is one segment of the Sound Play Language Awareness Story Hour. The parents in the class have already participated in a parent orientation to learn about the “methods to the madness.” The story hour format is designed to coach parents/caregivers how to use routine childhood experiences to support communication development. There are teachable moments in the simple, ordinary events of every day. While the situation described above might look like silly dramatics, strategies are purposefully woven into each moment:   1. Movement to help toddlers get their bodies ready to listen 2. Sign language 3. Pairing actions with sounds 4. Gesture language 5. Modeling early speech sounds   SPLASH classes are open and meaningful for children of all ability levels between the ages of two and three, yet many of the children who attend SPLASH are nonverbal or minimally verbal. When you are two years old, and “supposed to be talking,” big people spend a lot of time trying to make you talk, asking you to say things. In SPLASH, there is no pressure to imitate. Nothing we do in the class is about trying to make children talk. Rather, we are drawing them in, providing models of achievable speech and language targets in disguised ways. For example, when the woman is hot and lets out a big sigh, it is simply exhaling, and the children try it too. A loud exhale can be a starting point for the ‘h’ sound. Children who are already talking, delight in joining and imitating. They are wonderful models for their peers.   A former SPLASH parent summed up her experience this way: “The brilliance behind the program is that no child is pressured in any capacity to speak. Instead, they are led to speak, on their own accord in a fun and predictable way. This is accomplished by pairing words with actions, reading stories repetitively yet with different twists each week, and having the children experience textures, sounds and movements. The environment is fun, playful and nurturing.”   If there is a two year old in your life, take the plunge – join us at SPLASH!   Upcoming Sessions: 2019 Spring Session: Wednesdays, 9:30-10:30am March 27 - May 1 and May 15 - 29   Space is limited! Please call Excentia’s S. June Smith Center at 717-299-4829 ext. 7 to register. Learn more here.

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Loose Parts

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When exploring TimberNook of Lancaster County at Climber’s Run, a number of random items might catch your eye...a wood pallet by the creek, a spool in the grass, sheer curtains hanging from a branch, a rain gutter leaning against a tree, and baskets of odds and ends. These items, with nature as their backdrop, begin exciting the imagination almost effortlessly - but why? What’s the thinking behind including these items in the woods? The answer is that what might appear to be “random” items are actually materials for inspiring a child’s creative play, called “loose parts."   The concept of loose parts came from the British architect, Simon Nicholson, in 1971 to describe “open-ended materials that can be used and manipulated in many ways.” For example, one of our favorite loose parts at TimberNook of Lancaster County will be tree cookies. Tree cookies are small, thin, round tree branch cuttings that may be used as plates to serve friends a pretend meal, stepping stones to an enchanted forest, a delicious doughnut, or a fence for exotic animals. Loose parts spark a child’s imagination and play.   Maybe this is why a young child sometimes finds the gift box of a toy more fun than the toy itself. The box is just more “loose” and without the constraints implied by the toy’s design and function. This type of flexible, limitless imagination play is what we encourage at TimberNook of Lancaster County, and loose parts are a key part of it.   Want to read more on loose parts? Loose Parts 2: Inspiring Play with Infants and Toddlers (Loose Parts Series) Paperback – July 12, 2016 by Lisa Daly (Author), Miriam Beloglovsky (Author) https://extension.psu.edu/programs/betterkidcare/early-care/tip-pages/all/loose-parts-what-does-this-mean http://www.communityplaythings.com/resources/articles/2015/loose-parts  

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Sensory Play

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Sensory processing is getting a lot of attention in the world of child development. Much of the public knowledge centers on children who are overly sensitive to sensations like noise, touch, and movement which may cause a child to respond in an aggressive or withdrawn manner. Sensory-sensitive activities are springing up in lots of locations, including Lancaster. Excentia has consulted with the Lancaster Science Factory and the Barnstormers for their sensory-friendly events. These events are much more comfortable for children who are easily stimulated.   But did you know that other types of sensory processing difficulties? In the first example, the children are too aware of sensation. However, there are also children who do not register sensation like their peers; they crave more input. They may respond to this need by being overly active and seeking sensation, or they may appear disinterested and unmotivated.   We all have tendencies based on our individual processing styles (fun fact – nothing gets into the brain except by way of our various sensory systems, and there are more than the 5 senses we commonly hear about). Personally, the tactile/touch system dictates some of my life. For example, I have a hard time getting work done if I am wearing long sleeves. Unusual, I know!   The first three years of life are referred to as the Sensory-Motor Period. Children experience lots of new adventures and their brain is organizing sensation in a functional way. They learn one of the most important skills for the future: self-regulation. Self-regulation is seen in our ability to calm down at the end of the day, pay attention to tasks, and other vital activities. Lack of self-regulation can lead to issues with sleep and behavior.   Childhood play is a major regulator of sensory stimulation. Children seem to have a natural sense of what their bodies need, just as they know when they are thirsty or hungry. The subsequent years of child development build on that foundation. Children need access to play that has them moving, processing, and problem-solving.   TimberNook creates child-led play with lots of opportunity to engage all of our senses. The sensory benefits of TimberNook have been demonstrated in a University of New Hampshire Occupational Therapy Research Study (2016). The results of the study “suggest that the quality of social interaction among the children did collectively differ between TimberNook and the children’s typical play environment. The environments were specifically different in their supportiveness regarding the objects available, the amount of space and configuration of that space, and sensory opportunities. We concluded that environments offering greater opportunities of objects, space, and sensory exploration, such as TimberNook, appear to support better quality of social interaction.​"   Are you interested in learning more? A portion of our TimberNook Information Session on January 22nd will be aimed at teaching attendees more about the developmental foundations of sensory processing. Sign up here.

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Let the Children Play

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As a pediatric occupational therapist with many years of learning in both formal and informal ways about early child development, I have developed some personal “guiding rules:" A child’s relationship to his/her mommy/daddy/loving adult is primary. Our role with an infant is to nurture and protect. Easy. The not-so-easy role is the gradual changes that should occur during childhood where parents step back and allow the child to learn from their own experiences. Allowing a child to take a risk; difficult. A child’s relationship to “Mother Nature” is a key component of development. For babies, this refers to gravity. As a society we have “over-containered” babies: infant seats, strollers, swings. Babies need to move and maximize the time they are playing on the floor. Children, too, need to move. Run. Climb. Roll down a hill. The evidence is in and it indicates that these activities promote far more than physical development. The architecture of the brain is established by our early experiences. We are sensory beings. Information gets into the brain by the sensory systems. Some of these are not widely recognized by everyone such as the proprioceptive system (information from our muscles and joints) and the vestibular system (information about movement and how we relate to gravity). They are vital components of our development. Play IS a child’s occupation. As an occupational therapist, I have frequently been asked how occupation relates to children. Play is the answer. Not all play is created equally. We must choose those opportunities that allow children to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills while having fun. We want to stimulate their imagination and creativity. Knowing the above, it will not be surprising that I was very excited to learn about TimberNook. It knows, understands and supports my “guiding rules." Tagged as the Ultimate Sensory Experience, TimberNook is both a philosophy and curriculum. Set in the outdoors, Mother Nature is used as a “third teacher” to provide an environment where children can have authentic play experiences. With multiple options for programming, TimberNook can serve toddlers from 18 months-4 years (Tiny Ones) in a parent-child setting, and 4-7 year olds (Little Wild Ones) and 7-12 year olds (Wild Ones) in a child-and-staff setting. Excentia is excited to announce that we are now a TimberNook provider and will be doing programming in 2019! We are working in partnership with the Lancaster County Conservancy to use Climbers Run Nature Preserve as our site. This unique location will have an area specifically planned to facilitate “play the TimberNook way” as well as the existing trails, meadows, a stream, and forested areas. Head over to our TimberNook Facebook page and click the ‘Like’ button to stay informed as we roll out the plans for next year. We will also start posting more detailed articles about subjects that support the philosophy of TimberNook of Lancaster County!

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What it Means to be the LPN for Excentia

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What it Means to be the LPN for Excentia In February of 2014, I joined Excentia as the only nurse. My background was varied, working with physicians for most of my career, skilled nursing facilities, dialysis, staff & training development, and dialysis education with patients and their families. My career as a nurse has now entered the 43rd year and I am still learning and growing as a nurse. Being new to working in ID/IDD I didn’t know what to expect or what challenges that I would be facing. How can I improve the health and well-being of the individuals that Excentia serves? Much to my surprise, the experience I had already attained prepared me on many levels for this position but it has given me the opportunity to expand my knowledge. What I find that is key to my position has been educating the staff, providing processes/protocols that involve the standard of care (i.e. hydration, dysphagia, infection control). Education gives the staff the skills, confidence and the knowledge to provide excellent care to those we serve. Talking to the individuals that may suffer from chronic, debilitating diseases on how to take care of themselves and to provide support should they struggle with lifestyle changes. Another key role is being a medical advocate for the individuals we serve. Unfortunately, my peers in the medical profession have limited experience and knowledge about working with the ID/IDD population. Decision making is a major problem for many medical providers, due to individual’s inability to understand informed consent when a medical procedure or immunization is recommended. This truly has been my greatest challenge. This delays the care that our individuals need and deserve. Lastly, but most importantly to me, is spending time with the individuals we serve. The simple act of holding someone’s hand when they are upset or scared, being the shoulder to those that are struggling with physical ailments is gratifying to me. Many years ago I was assigned a hospice case. This person was 90 yrs old and dying from cancer. She was in severe pain which was managed by morphine. When I finished giving her a bath and re-positioning her, I began to brush her hair. She looked at me and said “I love having my hair brushed, it feels so good”. So I kept brushing until she fell into a deep sleep. That day I had done my job, but I came home feeling so satisfied and thankful that I had given this lady real comfort. That is what my goal is everyday. I want to give of myself to provide support, comfort and real caring to the staff and individuals that Excentia serves. I feel extraordinarily blessed to have been hired by Excentia to care for such an awesome group of people! I love what I do and the people I serve as the agency nurse!

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What does Excentia do to enrich the lives of its individuals?

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Excentia reaches out to individuals with ASDs Empowering people with development needs, Excentia is a growing nonprofit organization with a great reputation, a respected human services presence in the Lancaster, PA. Excentia offers services to individuals with physical and intellectual disabilities, and more recently, our support services recognize Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) as covered under Excentia’s umbrella of care. According to the NIMH, ASDs encompass individual difficulties in communicating with others, seeing things from another's perspective (theory of mind), and making sense of information in his or her environment. Residential Services and the Autism Support Program This Autism Support Program operates within Excentia’s Residential Services, which provides housing options, community accommodations, and support resources for its clients. Direct Support Staff and Community Inclusion Specialists, for instance, are employed within Residential Services to facilitate their client’s individual-driven growth. We help the individuals reach their own goals, and we perform the groundwork that is a day-to-day living assistance. Simple acts of service foster an individual’s independence and inclusion within the larger community. My role in the Autism Program Direct Support Staff and Community Inclusion Specialists within the Autism Support Program offer a unique set of skills and services to their clients. We must do more than merely “show up” when scheduled because we as competent staff must be aware of our individual’s particular social, emotional, and sensory needs and challenges. I remember that my clients with ASD possess a sometimes-profound understanding of their own needs and limitations. The individual’s “problem” is that a piece is apparently missing when he or she engages a challenging-to-them task, like cooking a good meal or interacting positively with peers. My job is to provide that missing piece, which can be called “presence”. “Presence” Having presence with an individual helps motivate the person with an ASD to achieve his or her own level of success and independence. Within the Autism Support Program, my clients represent a range of capabilities and diverse degrees of independence and performance. Presence with an individual means being alert to his or her particular level of functioning in a given area. This social-emotional quality is a supportive force that is felt by the client who is often not able to verbalize his or her own need for appropriate help. My presence enables me to step in or back off. To assist the individual or to refrain from assisting. It is all about what the person needs presently to perform the task at hand. I am ready to help and respond in respect with my client’s needs. Working with an individual with an ASD One of my clients is responsible for tasks like wiping surfaces, reordering his belongings, and vacuuming floors, since his apartment is comprised of four rooms which all need cleaning and organization. So during one particular session, I scrubbed bathroom surfaces alongside him. I am no cleanliness expert, but this instance required my hands-on effort, and with a curious yet concerned demeanor, he watched my cleaning progress. Thus, our joint attention, my several verbal prompts, and his conversation about my point of view, cleared a vista into my personal mental state and as well as my own expectations. My presence in this instance incited a teaching moment that reinforced my client’s theory of mind (understanding the world from another's perspective) and, of course, we bolstered his cleaning habit. Commitment to “presence” Excentia is able to support its support staff who in turn support their individuals. The management and direct support staff of this organization really want to see the growth of their clients! Indeed, one of the company’s values is commitment, a virtue that highlights the dedication that is needed to see the most profound and lasting personal growth of individuals with or without ASDs. I can see this commitment expressed in my own presence with clients on the autism spectrum, and I have seen other staff show consistency, attentiveness, and follow-through with their own clients, too. Let us persevere and mature as committed support staff! Our individuals are ready to engage, and we should be, too. by Sean Jesiolowski, Community Inclusion Specialist / Direct Support Staff

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Give back to the S. June Smith Center

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Tis the season to give back! Every year when Christmas time rolls around I always find small ways to give back to my community. One year my family participated in an “adopt a family” for for the holidays where we got a wishlist from the family and headed out to stores like walmart and target for items. Another common way to give back to schools. Many times people donate books to kids at bookstores which is so easy when you are checking out. This year though I’m asking that you think about Excentia’s S. June Smith Center when you decide who you want to give back to, big or small.   If you aren’t already familiar with Excentia’s S. June Smith Center we provide Early childhood and early intervention services to help children, from birth to five, who are experiencing developmental delays or disabilities. While we don’t believe that growth and development occurs on a strict timetable, we do strive to provide our parents and caregivers with a proactive approach to ensure that their children are put on a healthy path of development. We have a collaborative approach and we work with the individuals involved in a child’s life that could enhance a child’s development, such as the family, caregivers, teachers, other support providers and members of the community.   One way for you to give back is to use Amazon Smile. Amazon Smile is a service that Amazon offers where you can link up your Amazon account with Excentia’s S. June Smith Center and .05% of every purchase you make is donated directly. So if you are already buying christmas presents or your monthly order of toilet paper for your house you are giving back without having to put any effort forward. I have provided directions below on how to link up your accounts below.   Choose SJSC as your charitable organization: Sign into www.smile.amazon.com on your desktop or mobile phone browser. From your desktop, go to Your Account from the navigation at the top of any page, then select the option to Change your Charity.  Or, from your mobile browser, select Change your Charity from the options at the bottom of the page. Select S. June Smith Center a Service of Excentia and get to shopping!   You can also follow the link below to a wishlist that the teachers at the preschools have added items that are in high demand for their classrooms. I have an example of the types of items on the list to the left.   https://www.amazon.com/gp/registry/wishlist/1HHSRY6OLNHXI/ref=cm_sw_su_w Another way to give back is to hop in your car and head out to a few stores for gift cards. Susan Oberholtzer, Preschool Special Education Teacher and Associate Director of Preschool Services at Excentia was kind enough to suggest a few items that you can donate directly to a preschool. Those items being Gift Cards! In particular gift cards to Target, AC Moore and/or Michaels are great because a lot of classroom materials are purchased throughout the year at these three stores. She also suggests iTunes gift cards because they are “used to add educational apps for the children to use during guided centers in the classroom as well as to add circle time songs.”   Get in the give back spirit and help keep the classrooms at Excentia’s S. June Smith Center stocked and running by donating today!   ALAM, Lexis

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